Pitchwars 2020 (Mentor Wishlist)

 It's Pitchwars 2020!

Every year, a group of agented writers mentor unagented writers in a contest. It is a huge event in the writing community. More information can be found here: http://pitchwars.org/new-start-here/

The mentor's wish list can be found here: https://pitchwars.org/pitch-wars-2020-mentor-blog-hop/

I try to participate every year. There are multiple benefits outside of the agent showcase. Making writer friends may not seem like a *huge* perk, but it really is. One, friends are nice. 

Secondly, and most importantly: Books are not made by one person!

I work with critique partners. I work with multiple editors for every project. I have beta readers. I have a manager. There is not one point in time where someone isn't holding my hand through a project.

The wider a writer's network, the greater the opportunities are to make my stories the best they can be.


So, I have to pick four out of a ton of mentors to submit to by the 27th. Fortunately for me, the Gothic genre is pretty specific. I've narrowed it down to seven mentors based on what they are looking for in a project. 

Now it's time to select the four mentors I want based on what I'm looking for in a mentor.


1. I like collaboration. Give me ideas, I'll work with them. I enjoy kicking the can until I find the 'it' factor. As long as it works for the story and the characters, I'm all ears. 

I'm not opposed to someone having an editorial approach and just saying, "fix this" but as a critique partner, I give ideas and it's fun. Let's have fun.

2. I'd like someone local. It's not a huge priority, more like a fanciful thing. This is a wishlist, not a list of demands. However, it is worth noting that timezones sometimes matter. I'm willing to work with schedules, but I am a bit of a Nihilist in the morning. Characters might die.

3. A twisted sense of humor. My comedy is drier than the Sahara desert and sometimes people don't pick up my jokes until well after I make them. My voice is monotone, and it's hard to tell, but most of the time, I'm not actually serious.

4. Honesty. Yes, it can hurt, but I am someone who has yet to be offended by a critique and I've been doing this for seven years now. My favorite book rating is a two-star on Goodreads. My skin is thick. I might withdrawal for a few days, but ultimately, I'll come around.

5. A love for the pulp fiction and the awful. Don't take things too seriously! I take my writing seriously. I try to make the best story possible, but that doesn't make the content itself serious. There is humor in everything I write because you can't have dark, gothic elements without light, funny moments.

I was in 10th grade when I first saw Moulin Rouge! The opening was so bizarre and laughable but then, BAM the ending hit me and I found myself sobbing uncontrollably. What happened?

My sister will tell you, I am not a crier. I shed tears when my first daughter was born and my sister said, "Look! She has a heart after all."

I talked it over with my Psychology teacher and she explained the theory of how it works. I went to school for Psych but still can't remember the theory. Point is, humor connects us emotionally to the story. If you want to cut my humor, you're not the mentor for me. I highly doubt anyone has issue with that, but still, it needs to be said. Especially since I love horrible films and draw inspiration from them.

6. Investment. I am super invested in my CP's futures as writers. It's only natural that I'd want the same. 


I think that's it. These are the things I'll be looking for in mentor wishlists. If a mentor doesn't tick all the boxes (number 2 is more of a perk really) on their wishlist blog, I'll prompt them for a response. I don't expect mentors will be looking at this, but if you do, drop a line to let me know you actually went out of your way, cause that is really fucking cool. For the most part, this is a way for me to conceptualize what I want in a mentor.

Until then. 

#JusticeForPeabody





 

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